13 Aug 2017

Crack Down on Cracked Tooth Syndrome

Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS), also known as cracked cusp syndrome or split tooth syndrome, is a painful condition that results from a crack in one of your teeth. CTS can mean anything from a tiny hairline split in the crown to a fracture that goes all the way to the root. If you have a nasty toothache and remember biting down on something hard, it’s time to call Dr. David Case. Don’t worry though, because the dental professionals at Family Dental Health are committed to giving you the best oral care that Portland has to offer. To find out more about cracked tooth syndrome, read on.

Symptoms of Cracked Tooth Syndrome

Although this condition can vary a little bit for everyone, here are some common signs you may have cracked tooth or cracked cusp syndrome:

  • Biting down in a certain area causes sharp pain
  • The pain goes away shortly after you have finished chewing or biting
  • You have localized sensitivity to hot or cold, and sticky, sweet, or sour foods
  • You find that you have begun favoring one side of your mouth for chewing denser food or all food
  • You notice sharp, localized pain while biting and immediately afterwards (indicating the opening and closing of the crack)

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27 Jul 2017

Prevention vs. Treatment of Oral Health

The World Health Organization defines health as “A state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”

Sadly, in our fast-paced culture, many of us settle for less-than-healthy or even truly sick conditions every day. We allow ourselves to be tired, achy, stressed and in pain more often than not. Why? Because it’s hard to prioritize our long-term health in a world of so many immediate needs competing for our attention. But long-term health is actually the most important need of all. Without our health, we won’t truly be able to enjoy life or contribute to a greater good.

Dr. David Case offers a few points on how to seek wellness and prevent oral health problems before they even start.READ MORE

13 Jul 2017

Crowns, Bridges, Dentures, and Implants: The Facts

There are lots of ways to deal with missing or damaged teeth. You’ve probably heard one of us at Family Dental Health talking about implants, dentures, bridges, and crowns, but have you ever wondered what they are and how they work? Dr. David Case knows that folks in Portland like to be informed, so think of this as your personal guide to things that might end up in your mouth. As always, if you have any questions, feel free to give us a call!

Crowns, Bridges, and Dentures, Oh My!

At some point in time, most of us will lose at least one adult tooth. The most common cause of tooth loss is gum disease, but it could also be an accident, a sports injury, or a cavity on steroids. Some people are even born without the ability to develop one or more adult teeth! Either way, the point is that most Portland residents will one day face a decision: how do I replace my lost or damaged tooth? There are many ways fill a gap in your bite:

Crowns

Crowns themselves do not replace entire teeth, but they play an important role in the process of stabilizing teeth and supporting other devices that restore harmony to your bite. Sometimes, Dr. David Case will place a crown on a Portland patient’s tooth to improve its appearance or strengthen it after a cavity has left the tooth unable to support a filling. Placed directly over the surface of the tooth (like a king’s crown), crowns can also be used to protect weak teeth, repair broken teeth, attach and anchor a bridge, and/or cover an implant. They come in a variety of materials and colors to suit a number of different needs.

Bridges

Bridges are permanent or removable dental restoration appliances that replace missing teeth with artificial teeth. By creating a literal bridge between gaps, bridges improve the functionality of your bite and the beauty of your smile. Bridges can be made of gold, alloys, porcelain, or any combination thereof. Both fixed and removable bridges make use of surrounding teeth for support, but fixed bridges are usually more stable than removable bridges. However, they are also more expensive that removable bridges.

Dentures

If you have lost most or all of your teeth, dentures may be the way to go. Dentures are natural-looking, removable appliances that allow you to eat and speak normally, despite a lack of teeth. They also help prevent sagging of the facial muscles, which can occur if there are little or no teeth to support the structure of your face. There are three types of dentures: conventional, immediate, and overdentures. Conventional dentures require the removal of any remaining teeth and a healing period (sometimes several months or longer) before they can be fitted. Immediate dentures also require the rest of your teeth to be removed, but are inserted the same day as the removal. Overdentures are a great option if you have a few healthy teeth left. They are called overdentures because Dr. David Case fits them over your remaining teeth, which provide support and help keep your jawbone healthy. Although the process of adapting to your dentures may be uncomfortable at first, having functional teeth is much better for your health in the long run!

Implants

In terms of preserving the integrity of the jawbone and providing support and strength to nearby crowns, bridges, and/or dentures, implants are the best option for missing teeth. Implants are small, titanium posts that Dr. David Case inserts directly into your jawbone. The bone grows around them, much like a natural root, and fixes them in place. Once the bone around the implant is fully healed, a replacement tooth is placed over the implant. This is the closest you can come to a natural tooth. Stimulation from chewing with an implant helps to preserve the jawbone and encourage circulation in the surrounding area. Implants are a permanent solution for a healthier smile.

Why fix missing teeth?

Even if missing teeth aren’t visible and don’t seem to affect your bite, it is still important to do something about them. Dr. David Case wants every Portland resident to know that the reasons for using crowns, bridges, dentures, and implants go beyond cosmetics and comfort. Your adult teeth are designed to work as a team, and any missing player can compromise the function of your bite, ease of speech, susceptibility to dental disease, and the health of your jawbone. Call Family Dental Health today to make an appointment and we’ll help you get the beautiful, healthy smile you deserve!

Sources

13 Jun 2017

Is it ever too late for dental work?

Let’s be honest. If you are like most Portland folks, you’ve probably put off going to the dentist at one time or another. Some of us have even avoided seeing a dentist for years at a time. In fact, one in three Americans avoid going to the dentist regularly.

After a while, that time spent away from Dr. David Case’s chair adds up, and so does the cost of dental work.

You start to feel and even see that your teeth are not in good shape. Plaque and tartar buildup, toothaches, sensitivity to hot and cold, bleeding gums, deep, dark stains, perhaps even loose, clearly decaying teeth. Either way, by the time you get to this point you are probably wondering – is it too late to see the dentist?

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27 May 2017

A Guide to Cavity Prevention

Imagine this- you have come to see Dr. David Case for a cleaning and routine check-up. The cleaning goes well, but then Dr. David Case tells you that you have a cavity. You’ve been dreading the possibility of this news and now you fear that something must be wrong, since you have been brushing and flossing regularly.

We at Family Dental Health see this happen every day and we want to put your mind at ease. Cavities are very common and usually a simple fix for Dr. David Case. Use this guide to learn about what cavities are and how you can prevent them.

Cavities: The Basics

Cavities are caused by tooth decay, which is a byproduct of too much plaque.READ MORE

13 May 2017

The Oral-Systemic Link: Risk Factors for Tooth Decay

Did you know the same plaque that decays your teeth can cause major heart problems? What if you could fight plaque and heart failure both by improving your oral health? Dr. David Case in Portland is here to tell you more!

Someone dies from a heart attack every minute, according to the American Heart Association, and most heart attacks (and 85% of strokes) are caused by cholesterol build-up – aka plaque.

But there is good news. You can work with your Portland dentist and your doctor to understand and minimize your risk factors for developing plaque and tooth decay.READ MORE

27 Apr 2017

Chocolate is Good for Oral Health – True or False?

Most of us were taught when we were kids that sweets like chocolate will rot your teeth. While this may remain true for some types of our favorite sweet snack, that doesn’t mean we have to take it off the menu all together. In fact, recent studies have found that dark chocolate, containing high percentages of cocoa, may actually be beneficial to your dental health. Dr. David Case at Family Dental Health wants Portland residents to know the facts so they can satisfy their sweet-tooth safely.

How does it work?

Dark chocolate is known to contain high levels of antioxidants, which work with our bodies to fight bacteria and disease. Dark chocolate can contain up to four times the amount of antioxidants found in green tea! High levels of antioxidants found in saliva have been proven to help fight periodontal, or gum disease, and slow tooth decay.

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13 Apr 2017

How Baby Teeth Help Mouths Grow Up Right

Every Portland parent remembers seeing their baby’s first teeth emerge, watching the rest pop up, and finally cheering as their child loses their first baby tooth, all in the blink of an eye! In fact, baby teeth come and go so quickly that some people are led believe they don’t have an impact on a child’s dental health later in life. Dr. David Case wants you to know that that couldn’t be further from the truth! At Family Dental Health, we are committed to giving our community access to reliable information on dental care, so here are the facts about why baby teeth matter. Feel free to give us a call with any questions.

A Guide to Baby Teeth

Baby teeth, also known as deciduous, primary, milk, or lacteal teeth, are a set of 20 teeth that will be in your child’s mouth for most of their childhood. Although baby teeth usually emerge at around 6 months, they begin forming in the womb as early as 16 weeks. By age 3, all Portland children should have all 20 of their baby teeth. By age 13, all their permanent teeth (except for wisdom teeth) will have come in.READ MORE

27 Mar 2017

Relief from Dry, Chapped, & Cracked Lips

We’re no strangers to extreme temperatures and dry weather in Portland, and our lips are proof. Most of us experience chapped lips at some point during the year and it’s not uncommon to see lips that suffer from annoying, painful cracks. Here at Family Dental Health we are very much attuned the oral health needs of Portland, so here are a few tips from Dr. David Case about how to keep your lips healthy, kissable, and free to eat and drink whatever you crave!

Do You Have Chapped or Cracked Lips?

If you have dry lips that are chapped, peeling, and/or cracked, you probably already know about it. However, here are some telltale signs:

  1. Sensitive or painful lips
  2. Smiling hurts
  3. You lick your lips often
  4. Your lips show clear signs of peeling or cracking
  5. You bleed from the corners of your mouth
  6. You have open sores or marks on your lips

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13 Mar 2017

Dentists Are Doctors, Too!

There are many kinds of doctors – Doctors of English, Doctors of Philosophy, Doctors of Medicine, Dr. Pepper… (wink).

Of course, when we use the term doctor, we most often mean a physician or doctor of medicine. But did you know that dentists are doctors, too? Every doctor has a specialty, and a dentist’s specialty is oral health.

Dr. David Case, your Portland dentist explains how dentistry is a specific branch of medicine, and what it all means for the link between oral health and overall wellness.

Dentists Are Doctors

Dentists are every bit as trained and educated as physicians. They have the same general education in science as physicians before they get clinical training in dentistry. This background education helps dentists look at you, the whole package, when taking care of your teeth.

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