13 Oct 2017

Caring for Your Dentures

The image of a glass full of false teeth on the nightstand is plastered all throughout popular culture. You would think that soaking your dentures in water and cleaner is sufficient, but Dr. David Case reminds us that proper denture care requires more than just that. In fact, denture maintenance is an important part of oral health. For Portland residents who have dentures or are considering them, it is important to know exactly how they function and how to care for them. If you have any questions, please give us a call at Family Dental Health.

How do Dentures Work?

Dentures are intended for Portland residents who have lost most or all of their teeth. Dentures are removable dental appliances that look nearly identical to natural teeth. They also function the same way, allowing folks with little or no remaining teeth to eat and speak normally. In addition to improving oral health, facial structure, and smile, having a good set of dentures can mean a world of difference for your general health.READ MORE

27 Sep 2017

5 Common Dental Myths: Fact or Fiction?

When it comes to ridiculous beliefs on dental hygiene and treatment, we’ve heard just about everything. However, the most dangerous ones usually aren’t quite so over the top. Unfortunately, a number of dental myths are floating all over Portland, so Dr. David Case is here to put an end to the misinformation. Don’t feel bad if you have believed one or more of these at some point, you’re not the only one, but do make sure to give us a call at Family Dental Health if you have any questions or concerns.

If your gums are bleeding, don’t brush them

The idea behind this false claim is that bleeding gums need to be allowed time to heal before they should be brushed, when in fact, gums bleed because they haven’t been brushed enough! This is because bacteria has built up around and beneath the gum line, irritating the gums.READ MORE

13 Sep 2017

Diabetes and Oral Health: What Your Dentist Sees

It’s no secret that diabetes is a health condition that must be treated because of the problems it can cause throughout the body—including in your mouth.  Consider that nearly 26 million children and adults in the U.S. who, according to the American Diabetes Association, have diabetes. Portland dentist, Dr. David Case wants you to know the side effects diabetes can have on oral health.

When people with diabetes experience high glucose levels, those levels could also be helping bacteria thrive—causing major problems for their teeth. Some diabetics have chronic inflammation and infections in their mouths.

Because of the risk, it’s important that diabetics take extra special care of their teeth. People with diabetes have special oral are needs, so it’s vital that you share this information with your dentist.

Common dental conditions associated with diabetes are tooth decay, gum disease, saliva gland dysfunction, infection, delayed healing and more.READ MORE

27 Aug 2017

The Benefits of Composite Fillings

Traditionally, dentists have used what’s known as amalgam, or special metal alloys, to fill cavities. However, modern dental medicine has advanced to the point that Dr. David Case can offer Portland patients a much better option for filling holes caused by tooth decay: composite fillings. At Family Dental Health, we would like to educate you on the benefits of tooth-colored, composite fillings, so please let this article serve as your personal fillings fact sheet.

The History of Fillings

Once upon a time, the choices for dental restoration materials were limited. Records dating back as far as 659 A.D. tell us that amalgams (mixtures of silver, mercury, tin, and/or copper) have been used widely for more than 1300 years. There have been a number of scientific disputes (referred to as the amalgam war) over the health concerns of using mercury, but the American Dental Association has always defended the safety of amalgam fillings. Until recently, amalgam fillings were favored because of their strength, resilience, and relative ease of preparation and placement. That being said, amalgams have three main drawbacks:READ MORE

13 Aug 2017

Crack Down on Cracked Tooth Syndrome

Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS), also known as cracked cusp syndrome or split tooth syndrome, is a painful condition that results from a crack in one of your teeth. CTS can mean anything from a tiny hairline split in the crown to a fracture that goes all the way to the root. If you have a nasty toothache and remember biting down on something hard, it’s time to call Dr. David Case. Don’t worry though, because the dental professionals at Family Dental Health are committed to giving you the best oral care that Portland has to offer. To find out more about cracked tooth syndrome, read on.

Symptoms of Cracked Tooth Syndrome

Although this condition can vary a little bit for everyone, here are some common signs you may have cracked tooth or cracked cusp syndrome:

  • Biting down in a certain area causes sharp pain
  • The pain goes away shortly after you have finished chewing or biting
  • You have localized sensitivity to hot or cold, and sticky, sweet, or sour foods
  • You find that you have begun favoring one side of your mouth for chewing denser food or all food
  • You notice sharp, localized pain while biting and immediately afterwards (indicating the opening and closing of the crack)

READ MORE

27 Jul 2017

Prevention vs. Treatment of Oral Health

The World Health Organization defines health as “A state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”

Sadly, in our fast-paced culture, many of us settle for less-than-healthy or even truly sick conditions every day. We allow ourselves to be tired, achy, stressed and in pain more often than not. Why? Because it’s hard to prioritize our long-term health in a world of so many immediate needs competing for our attention. But long-term health is actually the most important need of all. Without our health, we won’t truly be able to enjoy life or contribute to a greater good.

Dr. David Case offers a few points on how to seek wellness and prevent oral health problems before they even start.READ MORE

13 Jul 2017

Crowns, Bridges, Dentures, and Implants: The Facts

There are lots of ways to deal with missing or damaged teeth. You’ve probably heard one of us at Family Dental Health talking about implants, dentures, bridges, and crowns, but have you ever wondered what they are and how they work? Dr. David Case knows that folks in Portland like to be informed, so think of this as your personal guide to things that might end up in your mouth. As always, if you have any questions, feel free to give us a call!

Crowns, Bridges, and Dentures, Oh My!

At some point in time, most of us will lose at least one adult tooth. The most common cause of tooth loss is gum disease, but it could also be an accident, a sports injury, or a cavity on steroids. Some people are even born without the ability to develop one or more adult teeth! Either way, the point is that most Portland residents will one day face a decision: how do I replace my lost or damaged tooth? There are many ways fill a gap in your bite:

Crowns

Crowns themselves do not replace entire teeth, but they play an important role in the process of stabilizing teeth and supporting other devices that restore harmony to your bite. Sometimes, Dr. David Case will place a crown on a Portland patient’s tooth to improve its appearance or strengthen it after a cavity has left the tooth unable to support a filling. Placed directly over the surface of the tooth (like a king’s crown), crowns can also be used to protect weak teeth, repair broken teeth, attach and anchor a bridge, and/or cover an implant. They come in a variety of materials and colors to suit a number of different needs.

Bridges

Bridges are permanent or removable dental restoration appliances that replace missing teeth with artificial teeth. By creating a literal bridge between gaps, bridges improve the functionality of your bite and the beauty of your smile. Bridges can be made of gold, alloys, porcelain, or any combination thereof. Both fixed and removable bridges make use of surrounding teeth for support, but fixed bridges are usually more stable than removable bridges. However, they are also more expensive that removable bridges.

Dentures

If you have lost most or all of your teeth, dentures may be the way to go. Dentures are natural-looking, removable appliances that allow you to eat and speak normally, despite a lack of teeth. They also help prevent sagging of the facial muscles, which can occur if there are little or no teeth to support the structure of your face. There are three types of dentures: conventional, immediate, and overdentures. Conventional dentures require the removal of any remaining teeth and a healing period (sometimes several months or longer) before they can be fitted. Immediate dentures also require the rest of your teeth to be removed, but are inserted the same day as the removal. Overdentures are a great option if you have a few healthy teeth left. They are called overdentures because Dr. David Case fits them over your remaining teeth, which provide support and help keep your jawbone healthy. Although the process of adapting to your dentures may be uncomfortable at first, having functional teeth is much better for your health in the long run!

Implants

In terms of preserving the integrity of the jawbone and providing support and strength to nearby crowns, bridges, and/or dentures, implants are the best option for missing teeth. Implants are small, titanium posts that Dr. David Case inserts directly into your jawbone. The bone grows around them, much like a natural root, and fixes them in place. Once the bone around the implant is fully healed, a replacement tooth is placed over the implant. This is the closest you can come to a natural tooth. Stimulation from chewing with an implant helps to preserve the jawbone and encourage circulation in the surrounding area. Implants are a permanent solution for a healthier smile.

Why fix missing teeth?

Even if missing teeth aren’t visible and don’t seem to affect your bite, it is still important to do something about them. Dr. David Case wants every Portland resident to know that the reasons for using crowns, bridges, dentures, and implants go beyond cosmetics and comfort. Your adult teeth are designed to work as a team, and any missing player can compromise the function of your bite, ease of speech, susceptibility to dental disease, and the health of your jawbone. Call Family Dental Health today to make an appointment and we’ll help you get the beautiful, healthy smile you deserve!

Sources

13 Jun 2017

Is it ever too late for dental work?

Let’s be honest. If you are like most Portland folks, you’ve probably put off going to the dentist at one time or another. Some of us have even avoided seeing a dentist for years at a time. In fact, one in three Americans avoid going to the dentist regularly.

After a while, that time spent away from Dr. David Case’s chair adds up, and so does the cost of dental work.

You start to feel and even see that your teeth are not in good shape. Plaque and tartar buildup, toothaches, sensitivity to hot and cold, bleeding gums, deep, dark stains, perhaps even loose, clearly decaying teeth. Either way, by the time you get to this point you are probably wondering – is it too late to see the dentist?

READ MORE

27 May 2017

A Guide to Cavity Prevention

Imagine this- you have come to see Dr. David Case for a cleaning and routine check-up. The cleaning goes well, but then Dr. David Case tells you that you have a cavity. You’ve been dreading the possibility of this news and now you fear that something must be wrong, since you have been brushing and flossing regularly.

We at Family Dental Health see this happen every day and we want to put your mind at ease. Cavities are very common and usually a simple fix for Dr. David Case. Use this guide to learn about what cavities are and how you can prevent them.

Cavities: The Basics

Cavities are caused by tooth decay, which is a byproduct of too much plaque.READ MORE

13 May 2017

The Oral-Systemic Link: Risk Factors for Tooth Decay

Did you know the same plaque that decays your teeth can cause major heart problems? What if you could fight plaque and heart failure both by improving your oral health? Dr. David Case in Portland is here to tell you more!

Someone dies from a heart attack every minute, according to the American Heart Association, and most heart attacks (and 85% of strokes) are caused by cholesterol build-up – aka plaque.

But there is good news. You can work with your Portland dentist and your doctor to understand and minimize your risk factors for developing plaque and tooth decay.READ MORE