Browse by Page
Appointments
Connect on Social Media
27 Mar 2020
March 27, 2020 by David CaseDental HealthDental Technology

Salivary Diagnostics: What Can Your Saliva Reveal?

If you’ve tuned in to any crime scene investigation shows, you’ve probably heard of salivary testing, but did you know it’s becoming increasingly common in dental offices? Salivary testing has a bright future in medicine because of how much it can tell us about your state of health—both oral and overall.

One of the reasons it’s especially important in the dental office is because we screen for oral cancer, and the number one culprit for diagnoses in recent years is human papillomavirus (HPV), which can be detected through saliva.

READ MORE

13 Mar 2020
March 13, 2020 by David CaseDental HealthDental Services

Crowning Glory: Esthetic Dental Crowns

The first known dental crowns were made as far back as 200 A.D. when Etruscans used gold to create crowns and bridges. Can you imagine what the process must have been like without the technology we have now? If you’d rather not, we can’t blame you!

Thanks to digital x-rays and impressions, dentists today can create crowns that blend in so well with the rest of the mouth, you’ll forget you weren’t born with them. The updated materials appear very natural, especially ceramic and porcelain.

But I Love Gold!

Gold is still an option for crowns today, and it’s not a bad option in terms of durability—they’re extremely fracture-resistant and seal well to prevent recurrent tooth decay. However, gold is usually the most expensive material for the creation of crowns, and most people want their dental restorations to be a secret only they know—especially if the tooth in need of crowning is an incisor or canine.

For those anterior (front) teeth, porcelain and ceramic are excellent crown options; they’re the most economical solution and can be color-matched to blend in with your smile perfectly.

READ MORE

27 Feb 2020
February 27, 2020 by David CaseDental Health

Good, Clean, Wholesome Family Dentistry

You love your teeth. You brush them twice a day, floss once a day, and see your dentist regularly. Right? We love your teeth, too! In fact, there’s so much to know about caring for your oral health that dentistry has quite a few categories of specialties and different kinds of dentists.

The primary dentist in your life should be your family dentist, also known as a general dentist. Your family dentist is who you will see most often for dental check-ups. But how exactly is family dentistry different from other kinds of dentistry? Portland dentist Dr. David Case shares more below about family dentistry.

Types of Dentistry

All dentists have an undergraduate degree and then go on to about four years of dental school. This earns them either a doctorate of dental medicine (DMD) or a doctorate of dental surgery (DDS). To become more specialized, the dentist will need additional education and clinical experience.

READ MORE

13 Feb 2020
February 13, 2020 by David CaseDental Health

When a Toothache is Not a Toothache

Most of us have experienced a toothache. At their mildest, toothaches may cause just enough discomfort to get on your nerves and disrupt your concentration, but at their worst, they can be debilitating. Because the pain feels like it’s coming from your tooth, it’s natural to assume that all toothaches are caused by cavities, gum disease or some other tooth-related problem. However, Dr. David Case would like you to know that not all toothaches are related to your teeth.

Wait, what? Toothaches that have nothing to do with teeth? Yes– as anyone at Family Dental Health will tell you –it is possible and it does happen. That being said, most toothaches are tooth-related.

How can a toothache not come from your tooth?

Your mouth is a complex organ that contains a number of different types of tissue, nerves, and microorganisms. While run-of-the-mill dental problems like tooth decay and gum disease are responsible for the majority of toothaches, there are many other conditions that can cause localized pain in one or more teeth –and some of them have nothing to do with your teeth. Here are a few examples:

READ MORE

27 Jan 2020
January 27, 2020 by David CaseDental Technology

Rising Oral Cancer Rates – Have You Been Screened?

The prevalence of oral cancer in America is increasing, with an estimated 49,750 people being diagnosed in 2017 alone. Of those newly diagnosed individuals, it is projected that only 57% will live 5 years beyond receiving the news. Oral cancer will cause almost 10,000 deaths annually, equating to nearly 1 person per hour.

These statistics are a lot to digest and can cause quite a bit of fear. This fear might be elevated when we look at the reason oral cancer death rates are high—not because it’s more difficult to remove, but because it’s usually discovered in late stage. This makes sense knowing that only 14-18% of dentists in the United States screen for oral cancer. That’s right, 14-18%.

However, Portland dentist Dr. David Case wants to provide you with peace of mind by educating you on what to look for and screening you for oral cancer regularly. Read on to learn more and feel free to give us a call with questions and concerns.

Open Up

A lot of us feel we’re familiar with the appearance of our mouths. We conduct diligent oral hygiene routines (we certainly hope this is true!) and take note of any discomfort, pain, and/or abnormal coloring of our tongue, teeth, and gums. But what about your cheeks, hard and soft palates, uvula, tonsils, and underneath your tongue? Do you regularly examine your inner lips, lift the top and lower the bottom in order to see more of your gums?

READ MORE

13 Jan 2020
January 13, 2020 by David CaseDental Health

Warning Signs of Impacted Wisdom Teeth

Nicknamed for the fact that they come into your mouth and your life by the time you are mature and supposedly “wise”, wisdom teeth are simply the last set of molars that grow furthest back in your mouth. If you’re experiencing some specific pain in your gums and jaw, you may be wondering if you have impacted wisdom teeth.

Dr. David Case takes care of wisdom teeth from all around Portland! Let us tell you more about impacted wisdom teeth and what to do if you have them.

What are Impacted Wisdom Teeth?

Your wisdom teeth are the third and final set of molars you’ll get. They usually come in when you are between 17 and 21 years old. Sometimes they appear later in life, while some people’s wisdom teeth never grow in at all. (Does that mean those people never become wise? Hard to say.)

As with other teeth, wisdom teeth are expected to break through the gums and become totally visible when they emerge. However, in some situations, they remain deep in the jawbone or never break through the gums. These are examples of impacted wisdom teeth.

READ MORE

27 Dec 2019
December 27, 2019 by David CaseDental Health

The Science of Tooth Decay

If you’ve visited our blog before, you know that we love to talk about tooth decay. The chances are, everyone has had or will have tooth decay at one point. It is classified by the National Institutes of Health as the most prevalent disease in the world. Today we’re going to talk about a few of the factors involved in causing tooth decay and what you and Portland dentist Dr. David Case can do to protect your smile.

The Unique Makeup of Your Teeth

Even within your own mouth, teeth vary widely in shape, size, and enamel quality and consistency. Some teeth are harder than others, and some—especially molars—may have deep fissures that can trap bacteria, causing decay. Additional defects in enamel formation can cause yellow or brown areas on your teeth that are more susceptible to caries (tooth decay).

The pH Level in Your Mouth

Research indicates that acidity in your mouth plays an important role in developing tooth decay. A low pH (an acidic state) allows decay-causing bacteria to thrive. Acidity is affected by the quality and flow of saliva, diet, and a number of other factors. For example, after eating carbohydrates, people will experience a temporary drop in the pH of their saliva.

Diet

One of the biggest and most easily controlled risk factors for tooth decay is diet. An unhealthy diet rich in sugars and sticky foods will increase the amount of plaque formed and lower the acidity of your saliva.

Saliva

READ MORE

13 Dec 2019
December 13, 2019 by David CaseDental Services

Dentistry for Kids: What the Tooth Fairy Won’t Tell You

Babies and kids are constantly growing and changing, and their mouths are no exception! Throughout childhood, kids lose their baby teeth, gain adult teeth, and they begin to take ownership of their own oral health. From brushing to braces to practicing their smiles, oral health is important for every kid at every stage. Read on for tips to help keep your kid smiling for life—we know you love to see your child smile, and so does Portland dentist Dr. David Case!

Caring for Kids’ Teeth

Your child’s first teeth—often called “baby teeth”—make their momentous early arrival and continue to serve many purposes until they fall out and are replaced by adult teeth. Baby teeth hold a place in the jaw, paving the way for the adult teeth to grow in properly.  Kids who develop cavities are more likely to develop them later as adults. Don’t dismiss the importance of oral health for kids, even though there’s so much transition in their mouth in these early days.

Basic oral health for kids includes brushing and flossing twice a day. Be sure your child is brushing long enough (and having some fun) by playing a favorite song that’s roughly two minutes long to brush along to. Very young children may still need help and supervision to be sure they’ve thoroughly brushed all their teeth. But don’t wait to teach your kid how to do this on her own—kids are more likely to participate if they feel empowered and valued in the process.

For kids 3 and up, fluoride toothpaste is safe and recommended for the best tooth care and prevention. Kids need good nutrition for growing, healthy bodies—teeth and gums included! Serve meals with lots of vitamins and minerals and make sugary snacks and drinks a rare treat to prevent cavities and tooth decay. And of course, take your child to see the dentist twice a year for checkups and professional cleanings.

Care for Every Occasion

READ MORE

27 Nov 2019
November 27, 2019 by David CaseDental HealthDental Services

Are Your Teeth Safe from Coffee Stains?

First things first, put your worries away! We are not about to tell you that your coffee drinking days are over. We know that each shot of caffeine is crucial and we cherish our coffee, too! Here at Family Dental Health, we want to educate you on what causes coffee stains and what you can do to fight them.

It’s no secret how Portland residents feel about their coffee, and we’re not about to get in the way of that love. However, we will help you keep your smile healthy and beautiful[LINK]  with tips that won’t drastically affect your lifestyle. Dr. Case and the rest of us at Family Dental Health are your oral health allies!

So let’s start off with the basics. Why does coffee stain your teeth?

Coffee is one of the biggest offenders when it comes to stained teeth, and the discoloration can be so bad it mimics cigarette stains. So what’s the secret? What can you do to keep your teeth shiny, but still get your caffeine fix?

Coffee and its Active Ingredient: Caffeine

It is best for your oral and overall health to keep your coffee consumption to a safe limit. Excessive caffeine, regardless of the source, spells negative effects for your heart and stomach and can lead to serious health problems over time. That being said, we won’t tell you to do anything crazy, like quit drinking coffee.

Guard Your Teeth Against Coffee Stains with These Three Tips

READ MORE

13 Nov 2019
November 13, 2019 by David CaseDental Health

Bad Breath: When Morning Breath Becomes Halitosis

It’s often said that a true friend will tell you if you have bad breath. Bad breath, formally known as halitosis, is embarrassing and can hold you back from truly enjoying your life and social situations. Like a good friend, Portland dentist Dr. David Case will tell it to you straight. Read more below to determine what to do about your bad breath.

Is Bad Breath Normal?

Yes. Sorry. But some bad breath is just unavoidable. Moderate and occasional bad breath is caused by the normal breakdown of foods for digestion. Most people don’t wake up with minty fresh breath because bacteria build up in your mouth overnight while you are sleeping. Keep normal bouts of bad breath at bay with good oral hygiene, by drinking plenty of water, and by chewing sugar-free gum containing xylitol.

Lifestyle vs. Medical Causes of Bad Breath

Your lifestyle or daily habits may cause you unusually bad breath. There are some things you can do every day to keep bad breath at bay:

  • Brush your teeth twice a day (and don’t forget your tongue!)
  • Floss once a day
  • Keep dentures & other oral appliances clean
  • Stop smoking
  • Eat a healthy diet including a variety of foods and enough calories
  • Avoid odorous foods like coffee, garlic, and onions

READ MORE

Go to the Top of the Page